Monsoon

Cherrapunji Annual Rainfall from 1901 compiled per Decade...by Vagarian Shitij Jain (Surat)

1901-191010257
1911-192011057
1921=193010605
1931-194011143
1941-195010915
1951-196012441
1961-197010503
1971-198011689
1981-199012242
1991-200012127
2001-201011162
2011-201910166
in  mms


The last column has the year 2020 still pending...(The above table has been added to Vagaries Extreme Blog on Monsoon Page..and will get updated there)
Over the decades, I do not see major variations or Rise/Fall in the rainfall..Your comments please


Withdrawal Record 2020: West Rajasthan 28th September. All India 28th October.
Latest Withdrawal Date All India Monsoon 17th October 2019 
Previous : 1st October 1961

Earliest Date of Monsoon Arrival in Kerala was 14th May 1960. Last date 18th June 1972.


Friday 28th July 2015

Colossal Rain Amounts till Tuesday morning in cms:

WEST RAJASTHAN:In cms
SANCHORE 24,RANIWADA SR 19,JALORE 18,BAGODA SR 18, JASWANTPURA 16,

EAST RAJASTHAN:In cms
MOUNT ABU 33,ABU ROAD SR 13,REODAR SR 12,VEJA SR 10

GUJARAT In mms:
DHANERA 435,WAV 416
DEESA 303,  BHABHAR 350, KANKREJ 34,THARAD 33,DANTIWADA 327,RADHANPUR 324, DEODAR 25
PALANPUR 218,UMERPADA 207, PATAN 206,SANTALPUR 199, Morbi 192,Tankara 184, SIDDHPUR 18,UNJHA 180,
VADGAM 180, Bodeli 171, MAHESANA 159, BECHARAJI 157,VAPI 114.
AMIRGADH 150, ,DANGS (AHWA) 142,GANDHINAGAR 105,QUANT 140,VANSDA 136.

KUTCH:In mms
NAKHATRANA 314,BHUJ 252,ANJAR 23,RAPAR 233,
KANDLA AIRPORT 190, KANDLA NEW 170,BHACHAU 146,GANDHIDHAM 142, Lakhpat 123.
In Kutch, Bhuj saw another 127 mms and Mandvi received 59 mms, and Naliya 36 mms in 9 hrs from 8.30 am Tuesday...
and Ahmedabad saw another 54 mms on Tuesday.
Bhuj now has a seaonal total rainfall of 520 mms (All in last 2 days)...against a annual normal of 360 mms !Nakhatrana, with a total of 433 mms, has crossed its normal annual rainfall of 390 mms.

Bharuch total rain as of today is 353 mms.
In Saurashtra the leaders , Bagasra, with a total of 893 mms (134% of Normal annual) and Gondal with an initial lead, ahead in total with 880 mms (140% of the annual)...

All India Toppers (min 7000 mm)...2019
------------
1. Lamaj, Maharashtra – 10790
2. Tamhini, Maharashtra – 9635
3. Amboli, Maharashtra – 9544
4. Patharpunj, Maharashtra – 9514
5. Amagaon, Karnataka - 9193
6. Shirgaon (Mulshi), Maharashtra - 9170
7. Tapola, Maharashtra - 8816
8. Jor, Maharashtra – 8728
9. Dawadi, Maharashtra - 8720
10. Gavali, Karnataka - 8549
11. Mahabaleshwar, Maharashtra – 8521
12. Navaja, Maharashtra - 8128
13. Ambone, Maharashtra - 8050
14. Walvan, Mahabaleshwar - 8031
15. Kitwade, Maharashtra - 7849
16. Dungerwadi, Maharashtra – 7790
17. Shirgaon (Bhor), Maharashtra - 7696
18. Castle Rock, Karnataka - 7624

19. Gaganbawada, Maharashtra – 7518
20. Matheran, Maharashtra -  7488




Top 13 Rainfalls in India for 2013:

Hulikal, Karnataka - 9383
Patgaon, Maharashtra - 9108
Mashtikatte, Karnataka - 8953
Agumbe, Karnataka - 8770
Talacauvery, Karnataka - 8696
Mawsyram, Meghalaya - 8610
Tamini, Maharashtra - 8409 
Surlabhi, Karnataka - 8482
Amgaon, Karnataka - 8440
Yadur, Karnataka - 8081
Mani, Karnataka - 7995
Kogar, Karnataka - 7775

Cherrapunji - 7560

2013 June:Nature’s Fury In Uttarakhand – Devastation Beyond Comprehension
Report from The Hindu, 21st June 2013: "A Himalayan Tragedy"

Excessive rainfall provides only a partial explanation for why the ‘abode of the Gods’ — the Himalayan hill States of Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh — has been battered beyond measure in recent days. For man’s excesses and follies have also been a factor in the destruction that nature has wrought. Whole villages, stretches of roads and communication links have been effaced. Thousands, including those from other parts of the country who were undertaking pilgrimages to religiously significant temples in the region, remain stranded. It is evident that the problem of poor soil stability on the steep slopes in this fragile region has been compounded by man-made factors like indiscriminate deforestation and mindless construction. Hundreds of buildings along the banks of the Alaknanda and the Bhagirathi have been swept away in Rudraprayag district alone. Downstream, the Ganga, Yamuna and other rivers have reached levels not seen in years, posing difficulties even in Delhi. This tragedy truly has the makings of a national calamity.
A mighty task of evacuation, relief and reconstruction lies ahead. The longer term lessons are many. Towns and villages in such terrain ought to be better planned. There should be a comprehensive renewal and relook at construction techniques and methods employed. Better systems of forecasting and dissemination of weather-related information are also essential. Over the past weekend, the India Meteorological Department did issue routine warnings about the possibility of heavy to very heavy rains, but these were not sufficiently stern, considering the uncharacteristically high precipitation levels that were recorded since. It is also unclear if the warnings were acted upon with alacrity and disseminated promptly by the State authorities. Crucially, a 2011 notification to declare as eco-sensitive a zone extending to a distance of 130 km from Gomukh where the Alaknanda begins, up to Uttarkashi, remains unenforced to this day. The Uttarakhand government’s misgivings on this move, based on the argument that it would impede development, need to be re-examined in an informed manner. Strategies to ensure better overall management of water resources in the region are needed. However, observations by the Comptroller and Auditor General in 2010 expressing concern over disturbance to the natural ecology and destabilisation of hill slopes caused by the construction of hydel projects along the Bhagirathi and the Alaknanda, and over the failure of the administration to plant enough trees to mitigate risks arising out of soil degradation, have a fresh resonance at this point.






Lowest SW Monsoon(Jun -Sep) rainfall averages in India -> 
1) Tiruchendur , Thoothukudi(Tuticorin) disrict ,Tamilnadu : 2.08 cms
2) Keeranoor , Thoothukudi(Tuticorin) disrict ,Tamilnadu : 2.15 cms 
3) Kulasekharapatnam , Thoothukudi(Tuticorin) disrict ,Tamilnadu : 2.98 cms..sent by Rohit Aroskar

Leh Flash Floods: 6th August 2010
My friend was in Leh, Chogamsar area, Leh, where it rained heavily. 
According to him, he is just presuming without rain guage, from his experiance. It rained from 12.30 am till 1.30 am, very very very heavy. He estimates, maybe 150 mms/hour. Then from 1.30 am till 3.30 at maybe 75 mms/hour. And slow rain from 3.30 am till 5.30 am. Total in 5 hrs must be about approximately 250-270 mms, AT THE MOST.
The cloudburst itself occurred between 0000–0030 hours IST on 6 August 2010, leading to flash flooding, debris flows, and mudslides over the region. The rainfall distribution was highly spatially variable. The most intense part of the storm was focused in a 6 km wide band parallel to, and a few kilometers from, the river Indus. This band was centred over most of the major settlements in the area, including Leh.[2] Outside the band, the rainfall intensity was unremarkable; the only weather station in the area, at Leh airport, recorded only 12.8 mm of total rainfall for the night of 6 August.[11] However, within it precipitation intensities were over an order of magnitude higher, peaking at at least 150 mm/h over Leh during the most intense part of the storm.[2] Some estimates of the maximum total rainfall in some places were as high as 250 mm.[12] Note that the implied 75 mm of rain over Leh during the most intense part of the storm is equivalent to around a year's worth of rain falling in 30 minutes...wikipedia.


Places which gets 5000 mm rainfall in a year & Wettest place in each state of India
(Courtesy Pradeep John)

As regards India, the southwest monsoon is the heavy rain season lasting from June through September. Rainfall is measured on a daily basis at about 6000 stations and measurements at many stations are available for over 100 years. As of 1962, the available mean annual rainfall records (IMD, 1962) for several stations in India indicate that there are only 14 stations which receive mean annual rainfall in excess of 500 cm. Of these, 10 stations are located in the Western Ghats and the other four in northeast India. The maximum mean annual rainfall recorded in India is 1141 cm at Mawsynaram in Khasi Jaintia hills. Cherrapunji and Mawsynram in Khasi Jaintia hills are world's highest rainfall areas. Agumbe in the Western Ghats has an annual maximum rainfall of in South India.

Apart from the 14 stations which receive 5000 mm rainfall, i have done research which took me nearly 3-4 weeks to obtain authenticated data from various sources to see whether other places that receive 5000 mm apart from IMD’s 14 places and in the process have uploaded the state wise rainfall record holders. This report will be updated often and popped up as soon as i get more data from public.

State Wise Rainfall toppers in mm 

Meghalaya
Mawsynram – 11410
Cherrapunji – 10870
Jowai - 6080

Karnataka
Hulikal - 8000 - 9000
Agumbe - 7640
Kudremukh  - 7000
Kollur-- 6500-7500
Kodachadri  Hills - 6500-7500
Gavali - 6611
Bhagwathi - 6000 - 7000
Bilegal - 6000 -7000
Nellibeedu  - 6000-7000
Bhagamandala - 6230
Malleswara - 6000 
Castle Rock - 5978
Gaganmola - 5750
Pullingoth -5940
Nilkund - 5500 
Akheti - 5192
Makut - 5060
Kundar - 4988
Karkala - 4827

West Bengal
Neora - 6350
Paren - 6109
Chel - 6096
Makrapara - (5500 - 6000)
Ambiok - 5640
Chuapara - 5500
Kuapani - 5432
Gish - 5385
Buxa Duar - 5323
Samsing - 5161 
Gorubathan - 5059
Margarets Hope - 5028
Meteli - 5002
Hasimara - 4859
Kurseong - 4800
Mahaldhiram - 4800
Raimatang - 4570

Maharashtra -
Dhamanohol - 8255 *
Amboli – 7446
Tamini Ghat– 6511
Tilari Ghat – 6500 – 7000
Bhimashankar – 6000 -7000
Dudhkheda – 6350
Koyna - 6315
Mahabaleshwar - 6230
Gaganbawada – 6210
Mulshi Dam – 5500-6500
Vaibhavwadi – 5913
Sonat - 5669
Dasve - 5334 *
Kati - 5323
Matheran -5170
Kumbhi – 4985
Koyna Dam – 4952
Pratapgad - 4743
Lonavala - 4700
Kasari - 4560

Arunachal Pradesh
Ipingo - 5400
Denning - 5280
Anini - (5000-6000)
Italin - 5000
Tidding - 4996
Elopa - 4800
Anelih -4600
Dunli - 4500
Khuppi - 4376
Tezu - 4400
Passighat - 4330
Gerukamukh - (4000-5000)
Pathalipam - (4000 - 5000)

Kerala
Walakkad - 8000-9000
Poochippara - 7000-7500
Mavattom - 6073
Silent Valley - 6000
Neelikkal - 5500
Karingad - 4918
Neriamangalam - 4507
Sairandhri - 4500 - 5000
Kutiyadi - 4166
Peermade - 4000
Vythiri - 4000
Ponmudi - 4000

Tamil Nadu
Chinna Kallar - 4650
Devala - 4120
Sholayar - 3707
Upper Kodayar -  3660
Anaimalai - 3523
Kakachi - 3500- 4000
Valparai - 2883 
Siruvani - 2775
Naduvattam 2558
Upper Bhavani - 2390
Gudalur - 2291

Goa
Valpoi - 4132
Sanguem - 3617
Quepem - 3573
Ponda - 3320
Mhapsa - 3031
Madgaon - 2928
Panaji - 2860
Mormugao - 2709 

Assam
Dibong – 3860
Jiadhol - 3500
Silchar – 3300
North Lakhimpur – 3270
Tipkai - 3264
Jinari – 3050
Lohit - 2991
Dhubri – 2850
Dibrugarh - 2670

 Andaman & Nicobar
Port Blair – 3130
Mayabunder – 2800-3200
Long Island – 2700 -3000
Hut Bay – 2700 -2900
Car Nicobar – 2730

 Mizoram
Saiha - 3000-4000
Lunglei - 3500
Mamit - 3000

 Sikkim
Gangtok - 3804 
Dikchhu - 3480
Singhik - 3480
Mangan - 3306
Rongli - 3207

 Manipur
Tamenglong - 3135
Tinsong - 3080
Jiribam - 2871

 Himachal Pradesh
Dharamsala  - 2940
Dalhousie - 2310
Chamba - 2000
Shimla - 1910

 Gujarat
Kaprada - 2950 
Saputara - 2900
Girnara - 2900
Mandva - 2900
Madhuban - 2800

Tripura
Kamalpur  - 2885
Kailasahar - 2450
Agartala - 2180

Uttrakhand
Dehradun - 2270
Nagaland
Wokha - 2123
Mongkolemba - 2013
Mon  - 1893
Sechu - 1853

Orissa
Simlipal - 2200
Sambalpore - 1750
Balasore  - 1666
Bhubaneswar - 1570
Koraput - 1551
Paradip - 1521
Cuttack - 1513

Jammu & Kashmir
Sonemarg - 1710
Reasi - 1668
Udhampur - 1510
Poonch - 1468

Lakshwadeep 
 Kavaratti - 1665   
Minicoy - 1638
Amini Devi - 1539

Chhattisgarh
Jagaldalpur - 1560
Pendra - 1340
Raipur  - 1288

Madhya Pradesh 
Jabalpur  - 1380
Hoshangabad - 1270
Bhopal - 1260

Andhra Pradesh
Vepada - 1318
Komarada - 1283

Punjab
Chandigarh - 1070
Ballowal Saunkhri - 1025
 Hoshiarpur - 1000

Harayana
Karnal - 814
Rohtak - 730

Amounts of Rains from 1st January till 15th September 2014 of some cities from Pakistan:

1.Rawlakoat 1,945mm (77.8 Inches)
2.Rawalpindi (A/P) 1,633mm (65.32 Inches)
3. Parachinar 1,557mm (62.28 Inches)
4. Islamabad Z.P 1,502mm (60.08 Inches)
5. Murree 1,493mm (59.72 Inches)
6. Malamjabba 1,447mm (57.88 Inches)
7. Kotli 1,412mm (56.48 Inches)
8. Dir 1,130mm (45.2 Inches)
9. Muzzafarabad 1,121mm (44.84 Inches)
10. Sialkoat 1,081mm (43.24 Inches)
11. Gardhi Dubatta 1,065mm (42.6 Inches)
12. Lahore (A/P) 992mm (39.68 Inches)
13. Gujrat (City) 908mm (36.32 Inches)
14. Jhelum 880mm (35.2 Inches)
15. Pattan 832mm (33.28 Inches)
16. Peshawar (A/P) 407.7mm (16.32 Inches)
17. Multan 266mm (10.64 Inches)
18. Khuzdar 252mm (10.08 Inches)
19. Quetta 155.3mm (6.212 Inches
20. Gilgit 95.6mm (3.824 Inches)
21.Karachi (A/P) 26.1mm (1.044 Inches)

22. Badin 112.3mm (4.492 Inches)

SWM 2014 thus far. An brief Review....6th September

From a threatening -47% down to -12% today. The country has received 655 mms against a normal of 765 mms till date. Thats the overall All India Monsoon Position. Thanks to massive rains in Jammu Kashmir and Punjab last few days, the overall deficit has come to almost reasonable and "civilised" levels.In fact, a few more % points reduction and the dubious label of "drought" will be wiped out. IMD considers a drought year if the deficit falls below -10%. Seems likely to be covered this year.
India normally receives 890 mms in the 4 months of SWM season as a long term average.
Situation is far better than the worst year 2009. That year, the deficit at the end of the season was -23%.
But, still there are a few areas of concern. Punjab, UP and Marathwada amonst them. I would put it like this: the situation in these few regions is still far from being "drought free".Marathwada may see very good rains next few days from BB-8.
However, thinking positively, the late surge of rains in Punjab and Rajasthan and NW india, will benefit the rabi season immensly. It will be saturating the soil with sufficient soil moisture.
But, the water position may not be as comfortable. The overall water reservoir stocks is below normal,except in Central India. North India, which has seen the maximum shortage of adequate rainfall, sees the stock of reservoirs at 79% ( 93% last year) of full capacity. Eastern India stocks show 68% (75% last year) of full capacity. Western India 70% (76%) of capacity and South India 68% (81% last year. Central India is the lone zone seeing better than last year levels at 74% (58% last year).
The Overall country average is 71% ( 87%) of capacity aginst full level.

Mumbai: The 2 IMD stations of Mumbai have touched their normal rainfall figures in spite of severe "ups and downs'' in a roller coaster ride. 
The Monsoon set in on June 16th  over the city.
June was dry!. The driest EVER in Colaba , when this South Mumbai station received a meagre 55 mms of rain in the Month. Santa Cruz was no better with only 87 mms in June. A very dry June !
After hitting the bottom, the roller coaster took an upward journey. A very wet July, with tremendous rains, and resulting in the wettest July EVER for Santa Cruz , with 1469 mms in the month....Now thats something.
But, it not over. August was going dry again. Save the recovery in the last 2 days of August, rains were minimal. But, the good rains in frst week of September pushed up the seasonal total to 2050  mms at Colaba and 2245  mms at SantaCruz. The normal seasonal total till  end September required is 2053 mms for Colaba and 2232 mms for Cruz.

Lakes supplying water to Mumbai are also showing good levels.Most of them are nearly on the overflow mark, and I would expect all to overflow next week. 

Water supply to the city could last for a year at current position and levels.



2 comments:

  1. The swm current entered kerala nd nicobar at same time 29 may 2011

    ReplyDelete
  2. At Dahanu on west coast of India SW monsoon arrived early in 2011 on 5 Jun ( Normal date 10 June ) than Akyab on west coast of Myanmar where it arrived
    on 7 Jun ( Normal date 28 May ) ..so all the way (from Nicobar till Forbesganj) ,Bay branch lagged or moved alongwith the Arabian branch which is rare..

    ReplyDelete